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Making Failure PayFor-Profit Tutoring, High-Stakes Testing, and Public Schools$
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Jill P. Koyama

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780226451732

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: February 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226451756.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 22 October 2019

Fabricating Failure: Making Up the Need for “Help”

Fabricating Failure: Making Up the Need for “Help”

Chapter:
(p.115) 6 Fabricating Failure: Making Up the Need for “Help”
Source:
Making Failure Pay
Author(s):

Jill P. Koyama

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226451756.003.0006

Culturing school failure requires an exaggeration or a misinterpretation, intentional or otherwise, of the signs of failure. As federal and state educational policies, and the policy-directed actions of school districts, schools, and supplemental educational service providers interact, failure is produced rather than found and confronted. This chapter presents three examples of inventing failure; the cases involve the actions of many in schools, the Department of Education, and United Education. Success, a possibility to which all strive, became at PS 100 overshadowed by its counterpart, failure. Even when all the recognized signs of success were apparent, the misreading of them erroneously rendered their measured success illegitimate.

Keywords:   school failure, inventing failure, success, supplemental educational services, educational policies

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