Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
WildnessRelations of People and Place$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Gavin Van Horn and John Hausdoerffer

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780226444666

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226444970.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 29 March 2020

Wilderness in Four Parts, or Why We Cannot Mention My Great-Grandfather’s Name

Wilderness in Four Parts, or Why We Cannot Mention My Great-Grandfather’s Name

Chapter:
(p.123) 13 Wilderness in Four Parts, or Why We Cannot Mention My Great-Grandfather’s Name
Source:
Wildness
Author(s):

Aaron Abeyta

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226444970.003.0014

This chapter is a family and sheep ranching history set in the Cruces Basin and Toltec Wilderness Areas of northern New Mexico. Against the backdrop of a blizzard, a young boy and his father set out to save their family flock from what would be certain death. The chapter explores the bonds of family and the father/son relationship across four generations. Included in the chapter are four sections focused on working and ranching in the wilderness as well as a backstory of abandonment. The chapter also explores the search for redemption and the heredity of loss and survival therein. The chapter serves as a coming of age narrative while examining the ways that wilderness and ranching are integral parts of a larger southwestern story of perseverance, land use, and the intersection of cultures.

Keywords:   wilderness, ranching, northern New Mexico, coming of age, Cruces Basin, sheep, Toltec Gorge

Chicago Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.