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Map MenTransnational Lives and Deaths of Geographers in the Making of East Central Europe$
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Steven Seegel

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780226438498

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226438528.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 28 October 2020

Objectivity

Objectivity

Chapter:
(p.41) Chapter Two Objectivity
Source:
Map Men
Author(s):

Steven Seegel

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226438528.003.0003

The chapter depicts the mapmen as “agents of a transnational, moving history” on the onset and for the duration of World War 1. Penck and Romer fell into feuds as claims about ethnographic movement and character of soil informed an increasingly nationalized debate about geographies conducted under the auspices of bourgeois cordiality and academic impartiality; the greatest insult hurled was to the opposition’s credibility as a scholar. Teleki began to focus on a Hungarian geography that glorified the concentration of the Myagar ethnicity in European lands. Bowman remained cordial with Romer but largely uninvolved in the roiling nationalism-packed Great War debates. Rudnyts’kyi was caught between borders as, despite his Ukrainian influences, he was supported by Penck as an expert of the East, since his geographies mainly focused on Ukrainian Soviet relations.

Keywords:   transnational, impartiality, objectivity, geopolitics, nationalism

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