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Connecting in CollegeHow Friendship Networks Matter for Academic and Social Success$
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Janice M. McCabe

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780226409498

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226409665.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 21 May 2022

Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.163) Seven Conclusion
Source:
Connecting in College
Author(s):

Janice M. McCabe

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226409665.003.0008

Chapter 7 provides an overview of the book’s findings and reviews its implications for research as well as practice. In a time of limited resources, I provide concrete and powerful solutions for students, parents, college administrators, and professors. Practical implications for colleges include: community members should have regular contact with each other, members should engage in a collaborative project together, and a strong status hierarchy between communities should be avoided. This chapter also discusses implications for colleges creating community through Greek Letter Organizations, online classes, roommate assignments, and campus diversity. This chapter offers advice for faculty in supporting students’ social ties and designing opportunities for students to get to know each other. It offers advice for students to encourage them to be involved in campus, value friendships, and gain social and academic support from friends. And it offers advice for parents of college students or soon-to-be college students to support their children in both academic and social life without becoming “helicopter parents.” The chapter ends by discussing theoretical implications for network analysis and the sociology of education. Close attention to the ways that network structures vary by students’ race, gender, and class provides important insights into the mechanisms perpetuating stratification.

Keywords:   friendship, networks, college students, parents, college administrators, professors, network analysis, sociology of education, Greek Letter Organizations, educational stratification

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