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Affective CircuitsAfrican Migrations to Europe and the Pursuit of Social Regeneration$
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Jennifer Cole and Christian Groes

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780226405018

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226405292.001.0001

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Transnational Health-Care Circuits: Managing Therapy among Immigrants in France and Kinship Networks in West Africa

Transnational Health-Care Circuits: Managing Therapy among Immigrants in France and Kinship Networks in West Africa

Chapter:
(p.101) Four Transnational Health-Care Circuits: Managing Therapy among Immigrants in France and Kinship Networks in West Africa
Source:
Affective Circuits
Author(s):

Carolyn Sargent

Stéphanie Larchanché

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226405292.003.0005

This chapter explores how therapy management groups--that is groups of kin, friends and local practitioners-- in the Senegal River Valley region come together to provide patient care transnationally. In the context of transnational migration to Europe, focusing on how health advice and resources circulate between immigrants and their kin and social networks in their societies of origin. Ethnographic research on immigrants from the Senegal River Valley region living in France indicates that illness continues to mobilize therapy management groups transnationally by allocating material resources, and facilitate knowledge-sharing about sickness etiology and treatment, care-giving, and the interpretation of misfortune. Transnational therapy management networks reinforce affective circuits between migrants, kin, and friends and the viability of both biomedicine and ritual and herbal specialists, even if biomedical and Senegalese spiritual approaches occasionally contradict each other and create tensions. The chapter suggests that the management of illness sustains the transnational reproduction of kinship ties, continuously spurring material, spiritual, and affective connections.

Keywords:   therapy management, kinship, misfortune, herbal specialists, marabouts, biomedicine, affective circuits, Senegalese migrants, Senegal River Valley, France

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