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Affective CircuitsAfrican Migrations to Europe and the Pursuit of Social Regeneration$
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Jennifer Cole and Christian Groes

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780226405018

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226405292.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 15 September 2019

Photography and Technologies of Care: Migrants in Britain and Their Children in the Gambia

Photography and Technologies of Care: Migrants in Britain and Their Children in the Gambia

Chapter:
(p.78) Three Photography and Technologies of Care: Migrants in Britain and Their Children in the Gambia
Source:
Affective Circuits
Author(s):

Pamela Kea

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226405292.003.0004

Many Gambians migrate to the United Kingdom to meet expectations of intergenerational care, which cannot be met at home given dire economic conditions. They frequently take children to The Gambia at the age of six months to three years to be cared for by grandparents and other extended family members, thereby having to parent their children from a distance. This chapter examines the role of technology such as mobile phones, computers and photographs in the maintenance and transformation of affective circuits, arguing that the exchange of photographs constitute a core element in broader exchange practices that are central to intergenerational relations, including negotiations of ideals of parenting, care, and the moral economy of households. In this sense, technology facilitates the realization of migrants’ desires fashioned around existing ways of life or different senses of self and kinship. Yet, parents and children’s use of technology may also generate tension and conflict, highlighting the complexities of reproducing long distance relationships.

Keywords:   affect, care, children, Gambia, intergenerational, parenting, photographs, technology, transnational, UK

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