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Affective CircuitsAfrican Migrations to Europe and the Pursuit of Social Regeneration$
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Jennifer Cole and Christian Groes

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780226405018

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226405292.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 17 October 2019

Forging Belonging through Children in the Berlin-Cameroonian Diaspora

Forging Belonging through Children in the Berlin-Cameroonian Diaspora

Chapter:
(p.54) Two Forging Belonging through Children in the Berlin-Cameroonian Diaspora
Source:
Affective Circuits
Author(s):

Pamela Feldman-Savelsberg

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226405292.003.0003

This chapter explains how Cameroonian mothers in Berlin, Germany, respond to the challenges of migration by deploying their infants to connect or disconnect affective circuits that tie them to husbands and kin, co-ethnics, the German state and NGO workers. Examining different domains of practice with respect to raising and caring for children, the chapter argues that belonging emerges through not one but several types of affective relationships; these relationships operate with different logics and create a tenuous, ambivalent, and multilayered belonging for migrant mothers and their children.

Keywords:   belonging, motherhood, children, care, kinship, hometown associations, welfare state, humanitarianism, Cameroon, Germany

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