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The Myth of DisenchantmentMagic, Modernity, and the Birth of the Human Sciences$
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Jason A. Josephson-Storm

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780226403229

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226403533.001.0001

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The Revival of Magick: Aleister Crowley

The Revival of Magick: Aleister Crowley

Chapter:
(p.153) Chapter Six The Revival of Magick: Aleister Crowley
Source:
The Myth of Disenchantment
Author(s):

Jason Ā. Josephson-Storm

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226403533.003.0007

This chapter turns to the infamous British magician Aleister Crowley, who overlapped with Frazer at Trinity College, Cambridge. This chapter shows that Crowley drew on the very text in which Frazer worked out disenchantment to stage his revival of modern “magick” [sic]. Hence, the narrative of disenchantment was self-refuting insofar as it reinvigorated the very thing it described as endangered.

Keywords:   Aleister Crowley, James Frazer, Magic, Magick, disenchantment, neo-paganism, The Golden Dawn, Occultism, Religious Studies, Oedipus effect, Sex magic

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