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Economics of Means-Tested Transfer Programs in the United States, Volume II$
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Robert A. Moffitt

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780226392493

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226392523.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 02 July 2022

Low-Income Housing Policy

Low-Income Housing Policy

Chapter:
(p.59) 2 Low-Income Housing Policy
Source:
Economics of Means-Tested Transfer Programs in the United States, Volume II
Author(s):

Robert Collinson

Ingrid Gould Ellen

Jens Ludwig

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226392523.003.0002

The United States government devotes about $40 billion each year to means-tested housing programs, plus another $6 billion or so in tax expenditures on the Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC). What exactly do we spend this money on, why, and what does it accomplish? We focus on these questions. We begin by reviewing the history of low-income housing programs in the U.S., and then summarize the characteristics of participants in means-tested housing programs and how programs have changed over time. We consider important conceptual issues surrounding the design of and rationale for means-tested housing programs in the U.S. and review existing empirical evidence, which is limited in important ways. Finally, we conclude with thoughts about the most pressing questions that might be addressed in future research in this area.

Keywords:   low-income housing programs, housing assistance, vouchers, public housing, in-kind transfers, neighborhood

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