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Species and Speciation in the Fossil Record$
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Warren D. Allmon and Margaret M. Yacobucci

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780226377445

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226377582.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 18 September 2021

The Species Problem: Concepts, Conflicts, and Patterns Preserved in the Fossil Record

The Species Problem: Concepts, Conflicts, and Patterns Preserved in the Fossil Record

Chapter:
(p.28) Chapter Two The Species Problem: Concepts, Conflicts, and Patterns Preserved in the Fossil Record
Source:
Species and Speciation in the Fossil Record
Author(s):

William Miller

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226377582.003.0003

There is a growing consensus around the lineage species concept, and paleontologists can provide the temporal perspective that this view of species requires. The “species problem” involves more than just debating operational species concepts. It also involves making the case that species correspond to real evolutionary entities and visualizing what those entities could be– the ontology of species. These issues are closely connected to practical approaches for identifying taxa in fossil samples. Despite all the debate, there is a general concept of species applicable to all kinds of organisms. Paleontologists have a central role in this discussion, because when the crucial element of time is added to the discussion, the nature of species-as-lineages becomes much clearer.

Keywords:   evolutionary species concept, phenotypes, George Gaylord Simpson, macroevolution

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