Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Timeliness of George Herbert Mead$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Hans Joas and Daniel R. Huebner

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780226376943

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226377131.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 04 June 2020

Changing “Movements of Thought in the Nineteenth Century”: Historical Text and Historical Context

Changing “Movements of Thought in the Nineteenth Century”: Historical Text and Historical Context

Chapter:
(p.15) Chapter One Changing “Movements of Thought in the Nineteenth Century”: Historical Text and Historical Context
Source:
The Timeliness of George Herbert Mead
Author(s):

Charles Camic

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226377131.003.0002

Charles Camic examines Mead’s neglected posthumously published Movements of Thought in the Nineteenth Century, a book that is based on notes from a course of the same title, and shows how it relates to the intellectual context of the University of Chicago in its early years. Camic considers several offerings of the course first by John Dewey and then by Mead not so much to contrast the two thinkers as to trace the increasing emphasis on research science and evolution and the diminishing emphasis on nineteenth-century social sciences in Mead’s accounts. Camic’s study applies Mead’s views on the historicity of mind to Mead’s own work and shows how Mead’s own contexts, in this case specifically local contexts, shaped his historical narratives. The importance of the results of this study go beyond Mead’s contribution to the history of ideas because they exemplify the gradual replacement of a Hegelian-teleological narrative by a pragmatist account in terms of historical contingency.

Keywords:   George Herbert Mead, John Dewey, history of social science, scientific research, evolution, pragmatism

Chicago Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.