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Confident PluralismSurviving and Thriving through Deep Difference$
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John D. Inazu

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780226365459

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226365596.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 29 March 2020

Collective Action

Collective Action

Protests, Boycotts, and Strikes

Chapter:
(p.104) Chapter 7 Collective Action
Source:
Confident Pluralism
Author(s):

John D. Inazu

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226365596.003.0008

Chapter 7 considers the role of collective action (including boycotts, strikes, and protests) directed against our fellow citizens. Collective action reveals an inherent and perhaps irresolvable tension for Confident Pluralism. On the one hand, Confident Pluralism encourages collective action to resist and challenge forms of majoritarian power. On the other hand, collective action directed at other private citizens and their institutions exerts a kind of power that may be inconsistent with Confident Pluralism. Chapter 7 explores these tensions by considering a civil rights era boycott in Claiborne County, Mississippi, and the more recent Internet boycott of the Mozilla Corporation over its hiring of Brendan Eich. The aspirations of tolerance, humility, and patience do not point to a bright-line rule for our collective action, but they do offer some guidance. Let's call this the Collective Action Imperative.

Keywords:   collective action, boycott, strike, protest, coercion, Claiborne County, Mozilla, Brendan Eich, civic practice

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