Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Anthropologists in the Stock ExchangeA Financial History of Victorian Science$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Marc Flandreau

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780226360300

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226360584.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 18 September 2019

Subject Races

Subject Races

Chapter:
(p.244) Chapter Eleven Subject Races
Source:
Anthropologists in the Stock Exchange
Author(s):

Marc Flandreau

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226360584.003.0012

The chapter describes the simultaneous coming of age of a bi-partisan learned society (the Anthropological Institute) and of a bi-partisan bondholder protection body (the Corporation of Foreign Bondholders) whose respective top managements displayed large overlap with one another. The chapter interprets this coincidence in reference to the broader context, one of the creation of bi-partisan, more politicized institutions, that ensured political control over the institutions that provided information relevant to imperial policy making. Anthropology as an institution (materialized by the creation of the Anthropological Institute in 1871) played a central role in the relatively consensual structuring of empire as it emerged in the early 1870s and was maintained afterwards despite changes in the orientation of the ruling majority in parliament. The re-organization of anthropology in an Anthropological Institute, the chapter argues was part of the process of “subjection” that took place at this point. In conclusion, the chapter emphasizes the role of knowledge as a kind of property right and the institutions of knowledge as instruments that project the power of these property rights.

Keywords:   bipartisan, Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland, Corporation of Foreign Bondholders, John Lubbock, insiders, knowledge, property rights

Chicago Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.