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College ChoicesThe Economics of Where to Go, When to Go, and How to Pay for It$
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Caroline M. Hoxby

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780226355351

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: February 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226355375.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 29 May 2020

How Financial Aid Affects Persistence

How Financial Aid Affects Persistence

Chapter:
(p.207) 5 How Financial Aid Affects Persistence
Source:
College Choices
Author(s):

Eric Bettinger

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226355375.003.0006

The Pell Grant program is the largest means-tested financial assistance available to postsecondary students across the United States. Students from all types of degree granting postsecondary institutions can apply for Pell Grants. Yet despite this continued expansion of the Pell Grant, researchers have only limited evidence on the causal effects of these grants. Most Pell Grant-related research focuses on the effects of Pell Grants on enrollment decisions, specifically focusing on initial enrollment and choice among colleges. However, there is surprisingly little research measuring the causal effect of Pell Grants on student outcomes in college. Regardless of whether Pell Grants affect initial enrollment patterns, they may independently affect student outcomes. Using unique student data from Ohio, this chapter explores the causal relationship between need-based aid and student retention.

Keywords:   Pell Grant, financial assistance, college enrollment, student outcomes, college, need-based aid, student retention, Ohio

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