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African Successes, Volume IIHuman Capital$
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Sebastian Edwards, Simon Johnson, and David N. Weil

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780226316055

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226316192.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 20 October 2019

Alternative Cash Transfer Delivery Mechanisms

Alternative Cash Transfer Delivery Mechanisms

Impacts on Routine Preventative Health Clinic Visits in Burkina Faso

Chapter:
(p.113) 4 Alternative Cash Transfer Delivery Mechanisms
Source:
African Successes, Volume II
Author(s):

Richard Akresh

Damien de Walque

Harounan Kazianga

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226316192.003.0004

We conducted a unique randomized experiment to estimate the impact of alternative cash transfer delivery mechanisms on household demand for routine preventative health services in rural Burkina Faso. The two-year pilot program randomly distributed cash transfers that were either conditional or unconditional and were given to either mothers or fathers. Families under the conditional cash transfer schemes were required to obtain quarterly child growth monitoring at local health clinics for all children under 60 months old. There were no such requirements under the unconditional programs. Compared with control group households, we find that conditional cash transfers significantly increase the number of preventative health care visits during the previous year, while unconditional cash transfers do not have such an impact. For the conditional cash transfers, transfers given to mothers or fathers showed similar magnitude beneficial impacts on increasing routine visits.

Keywords:   cash transfers, conditionality, gender, child health, Africa

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