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African Successes, Volume IIIModernization and Development$
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Sebastian Edwards, Simon Johnson, and David N. Weil

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780226315720

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226315867.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 05 April 2020

New Cellular Networks in Malawi

New Cellular Networks in Malawi

Correlates of Service Rollout and Network Performance

Chapter:
(p.215) 6 New Cellular Networks in Malawi
Source:
African Successes, Volume III
Author(s):

Dimitris Batzilis

Taryn Dinkelman

Emily Oster

Rebecca Thornton

Deric Zanera

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226315867.003.0006

Cellular technologies have become increasingly important in the developing world; infrastructure for mobile networks has expanded dramatically over the past two decades giving access to remote areas without previous phone service. Despite this expansion, relatively little is known about the correlates of the rollout of cellular phone networks or the performance of these networks. Since the rollout of cellular networks has been largely spearheaded by an active private sector in telecommunications, how demand-side and cost-side factors affect the timing of rollout and quality of network service is of particular interest. In this paper we use new data to estimate the correlates of cellular phone access and network performance across rural areas of Malawi. We compile a dataset which combines administrative data of the entire cellular network of Malawi with geographic and Census data to describe the rollout and the performance of the cellular network measured by the dropped call rate. We find that both demand-side and cost-side factors are important in determining the timing of network access, while demand-side factors appear most relevant for the dropped call rate, one metric of network quality.

Keywords:   infrastructure, network allocation, demand and cost factors, service quality, Africa

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