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African Successes, Volume IVSustainable Growth$
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Sebastian Edwards, Simon Johnson, and David N. Weil

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780226315553

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226315690.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 20 October 2019

The Determinants of Food-Aid Provisions to Africa and the Developing World

The Determinants of Food-Aid Provisions to Africa and the Developing World

Chapter:
(p.161) 5 The Determinants of Food-Aid Provisions to Africa and the Developing World
Source:
African Successes, Volume IV
Author(s):

Nathan Nunn

Nancy Qian

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226315690.003.0007

We examine the supply-side and demand-side determinants of global bilateral food aid shipments between 1971 and 2008. First, we find that domestic food production in developing countries is negatively correlated with subsequent food aid receipts, suggesting that food aid receipt is partly driven by local food shortages. Interestingly, food aid from some of the largest donors is the least responsive to production shocks in recipient countries. Second, we show that U.S. food aid is partly driven by domestic production surpluses, whereas former colonial ties are an important determinant for European countries. Third, amongst recipients, former colonial ties are especially important for African countries. Finally, aid flows to countries with former colonial ties are less responsive to recipient production, especially for African countries.

Keywords:   foreign aid, Africa, food aid, economic development

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