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Aristophanes and the Cloak of Comedy"Affect, Aesthetics, and the Canon"$
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Mario Telò

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780226309699

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226309729.001.0001

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Delayed Applause: Competitive Aesthetics and the Construction of the Comic Canon

Delayed Applause: Competitive Aesthetics and the Construction of the Comic Canon

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 Delayed Applause: Competitive Aesthetics and the Construction of the Comic Canon
Source:
Aristophanes and the Cloak of Comedy
Author(s):

Mario Telò

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226309729.003.0001

Starting with a literary anecdote from Aelian that tellingly rewrites the audience response to Aristophanes’ defeated Clouds in 423 BCE, the chapter introduces the book’s overarching concerns: dramatic reception, the canon, and aesthetics—the character (including psychological and even physical effects) of the connection between play and audience, or more precisely how it is constructed. The discussion begins with the payoff of this construction, namely critical elevation culminating in canonical hegemony, before laying out the methodology, grounded in intratextual and intertextual readings, by which Aristophanes’ aesthetic discourse may be discerned. The chapter concludes with a preliminary examination of this aesthetic discourse, showing how Knights previews themes of the narrative mapped out in Wasps and the second Clouds.

Keywords:   Aristophanes, Clouds, Wasps, Knights, reception, canon, canonical, aesthetics, intratextual, intertextual

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