Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
High-Stakes SchoolingWhat We Can Learn from Japan's Experiences with Testing, Accountability, and Education Reform$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Christopher Bjork

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780226309385

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226309552.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 29 March 2020

Framing the Education Crisis

Framing the Education Crisis

Chapter:
(p.18) Two Framing the Education Crisis
Source:
High-Stakes Schooling
Author(s):

Christopher Bjork

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226309552.003.0002

Chapter Two situates the themes of this book in broader social and political contexts. It compares the forces that have been driving calls for educational reform in Japan and the U.S. over the past twenty-five years. The analysis indicates that while politicians in both locations have relied on a rhetoric of crisis to support their education reform agendas, the evidence used to justify those claims as well as the proposed solutions differed markedly. At the same time that the U.S. Department of Education was promoting expanded testing and accountability in schools through the No Child Left Behind Act, MEXT was decrying those very factors as responsible for the “crisis” the Japanese education system was experiencing.

Keywords:   political context, rhetoric of crisis, education reform, testing, accountability, no child left behind

Chicago Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.