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Tunnel VisionsThe Rise and Fall of the Superconducting Super Collider$
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Michael Riordan, Lillian Hoddeson, and Adrienne W. Kolb

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780226294797

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226305837.001.0001

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The Demise of the SSC, 1991–94

The Demise of the SSC, 1991–94

Chapter:
(p.201) Chapter Six The Demise of the SSC, 1991–94
Source:
Tunnel Visions
Author(s):

Michael Riordan

Lillian Hoddeson

Adrienne W. Kolb

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226305837.003.0006

As Congressional opposition grew, SSC construction accelerated in 1992 after a successful superconducting magnet test. Tunnel boring began in January 1993. But William Clinton’s election as President brought a new administration less favorably disposed to the project. At an April 1993 summit with Japanese premier Kiichi Miyazawa, Clinton did not request Japan’s participation in the SSC Laboratory. In June the House voted resoundingly for an amendment to cancel the project, but after heated House and Senate committee hearings, the Senate voted strongly in favor of continuing it. In early October a joint House-Senate committee decided to award the project its full $640 million budget for fiscal 1994. But on October 19, the House dramatically rejected the entire Energy and Water Development bill by a 2-to-1 margin, and Senate support evaporated. The allocated funding was used during the ensuing year to terminate the project and compensate Texas for its investments.

Keywords:   SSC Laboratory, US Congress, Japan, William J. Clinton, Kiichi Miyazawa, congressional hearing, project management, house, senate, SSC termination

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