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Concerning ConsequencesStudies in Art, Destruction, and Trauma$
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Kristine Stiles

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780226774510

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226304403.001.0001

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The Ideal Gifts and The Trinity Session of Istvan Kantor (2014)1

The Ideal Gifts and The Trinity Session of Istvan Kantor (2014)1

Chapter:
(p.87) The Ideal Gifts and The Trinity Session of Istvan Kantor (2014)1
Source:
Concerning Consequences
Author(s):

Kristine Stiles

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226304403.003.0005

This chapter analyzes the evidence of the role of trauma—cultural, political, and social—in the work of Istvan Kantor by focusing on his The Trinity Session. It first considers the proposition that the conditions of empire are enough to have already plunged entire world populations into states of rebellion, dissociated distraction, and numbness, all part of the etiology of trauma. It then discusses Kantor's reference to the many arrests he has provoked and endured as the result of his “ideal gifts” to art and society during the Austro-Hungarian Empire. It also examines The Trinity Session through the lens of extreme experience, arguing that its significance derives from the ontological depths to which he has pushed art in an effort to articulate and present truths about contemporary social calamity.

Keywords:   trauma, Istvan Kantor, The Trinity Session, empire, extreme experience, art, social calamity, ideal gifts

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