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Concerning ConsequencesStudies in Art, Destruction, and Trauma$
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Kristine Stiles

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780226774510

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226304403.001.0001

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Remembering Invisibility: Documentary Photography of the Nuclear Age (1998)1

Remembering Invisibility: Documentary Photography of the Nuclear Age (1998)1

Chapter:
(p.67) Remembering Invisibility: Documentary Photography of the Nuclear Age (1998)1
Source:
Concerning Consequences
Author(s):

Kristine Stiles

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226304403.003.0004

This chapter argues that photography can play a crucial role in the survival of the planet by enabling the visual knowledge necessary for remembrance, the prerequisite for agency. Photography was important to the precise targeting of the atom bombs that destroyed Hiroshima and Nagasaki. It can represent the micro and macro conditions of the nuclear age, depict the hidden places and conditions of nuclear weapons manufacture and storage, and display nuclear energy industries, as well as record humans, animals, and the environment damaged by radiation and fallout. The chapter proposes the terms “nucleography” for the unparalleled visual traces of the bomb's light, “nucleographic” for documentary photographs of the nuclear age, and “nucleocide” for that war that is its legacy. It also considers documentary photography as a branch of nucleography.

Keywords:   remembrance, atom bombs, nuclear age, nuclear weapons, nucleography, documentary photographs, nucleocide, documentary photography

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