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Integrating the Inner CityThe Promise and Perils of Mixed-Income Public Housing Transformation$
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Robert J. Chaskin and Mark L. Joseph

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780226164397

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226303901.001.0001

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Does Social “Mix” Lead to Social Mixing? Emergent Community and the Nature of Social Interaction

Does Social “Mix” Lead to Social Mixing? Emergent Community and the Nature of Social Interaction

Chapter:
(p.124) Six Does Social “Mix” Lead to Social Mixing? Emergent Community and the Nature of Social Interaction
Source:
Integrating the Inner City
Author(s):

Robert J. Chaskin

Mark L. Joseph

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226303901.003.0006

This chapter provides an in-depth analysis of the nature of the emerging communities and the extent to which they reflect the ideals of integration that lie behind the Plan for Transformation. We provide a nuanced exploration of the nature of social interaction and relationships among neighbors of different backgrounds, the nature of participation and engagement in community life, and the factors that condition (promote or constrain) interaction among residents of different income groups, housing tenures (owners versus renters), and racial and ethnic backgrounds. We demonstrate that policy assumptions regarding spatial integration leading to social interaction and social capital outcomes for public housing residents are overblown, as social relations for the most part remain distant and are often contentious. These circumstances are shaped by spatial dynamics, differential participation, organizational compartmentalization, and the enduring influence of institutionalized assumptions about difference grounded in notions of the urban “underclass.”

Keywords:   integration, social interaction, participation, engagement, social capital, spatial dynamics

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