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Jenni Sorkin

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780226303116

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226303253.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 30 March 2020

Women Kitchen Potters

Women Kitchen Potters

Susan Peterson, “The Julia Child of Ceramics”

Chapter:
(p.199) Chapter Five Women Kitchen Potters
Source:
Live Form
Author(s):

Jenni Sorkin

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226303253.003.0006

Three years prior to the advent of public television and in the same year Marshall McLuhan’s influential text, Understanding Media was published, the potter Susan Peterson (1925-2009) brought clay to an audience beyond the classroom. Peterson created and starred in a 54-episode television series titled Wheels, Kilns and Clay (1964-65). Peterson’s format: process-based educational television that takes place in a staged, kitchen-like setting, destabilizes the origins of the “post-studio” 1960s, which denigrated hand labor in favor of an industrial aesthetic, and pre-dates the symbolic and gendered associations of the kitchen in the decade that followed, the 1970s, when the kitchen became the iconic site of women’s universal oppression. Peterson’s kitchen is a proto-feminist space that anticipates early feminist video art.

Keywords:   Susan Peterson, Chouinard Art Institute, Los Angeles, television cooking shows, United States, Martha Rosler, sex role, twentieth century

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