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Jenni Sorkin

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780226303116

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226303253.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 15 May 2021

Forms-of-Life

Forms-of-Life

Marguerite Wildenhain’s Pond Farm

Chapter:
(p.55) Chapter Two Forms-of-Life
Source:
Live Form
Author(s):

Jenni Sorkin

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226303253.003.0003

Marguerite Wildenhain (b. France, 1896-1985) was the first woman to be named a master potter at the Bauhaus in 1925. Owing to her Jewish heritage, she fled Europe in 1941. Her subsequent career in the United States represents a series of exclusions: a Bauhaus-trained Jew, a French refugee/German émigré, a woman in the elite reaches of her male-dominated profession. But neither Wildenhain, nor any other Bauhaus-affiliated woman (not even Anni Albers) ever attained an artistic stature equivalent to that of their male counterparts. Through Pond Farm, the pottery she founded in rural Sonoma County, California, Wildenhain implemented a rigor Bauhaus-style training camp with a different mission: inculcating ceramics as a life philosophy, and artistic labor as an ethical imperative.

Keywords:   Bauhaus, Marguerite Wildenhain, Pond Farm, Jewish artists, United States, twentieth century, refugees

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