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Physics EnvyAmerican Poetry and Science in the Cold War and After$
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Peter Middleton

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780226290003

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226290140.001.0001

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Conceptual Schemes

Conceptual Schemes

The Midcentury Poetics of Muriel Rukeyser and Charles Olson

Chapter:
(p.117) 4 Conceptual Schemes
Source:
Physics Envy
Author(s):

Peter Middleton

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226290140.003.0005

By mid-century, social scientists such as Kurt Lewin increasing believed that a better understanding of the mind and society required scientific methods, especially the use of conceptual schemes. Muriel Rukeyser brought her interest in such conceptual schemes to bear on her discussion of science and poetry in The Life of Poetry, a book that anticipated “Projective Verse.” She had already investigated conceptual schemes in her biography of the nineteenth-century physicist Willard Gibbs, whose ideas on scientific method had influenced Harvard social scientists, notably Lawrence Henderson. From these sources, Rukeyser produced her own poetics of system. This theory is criticized for its limitations, and contrasted with Olson’s concept of the field. It is argued that Olson’s experience of Harvard social science led him to write Call Me Ishmael, using a conceptual scheme, and then to develop his field poetics. This poetics has proven very useful because it offers an open-ended approach to locating meaning in the myriad elements of a poem, and because it draws attention to the relation between poetic expression and other kinds of knowledge.

Keywords:   Kurt Lewin, conceptual scheme, Muriel Rukeyser, Charles Olson, The Life of Poetry, Projective Verse, Willard Gibbs, Harvard social science, system, field

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