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The Changing FrontierRethinking Science and Innovation Policy$
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Adam B. Jaffe and Benjamin F. Jones

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780226286723

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226286860.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 05 April 2020

Algorithms and the Changing Frontier

Algorithms and the Changing Frontier

Chapter:
(p.371) 11 Algorithms and the Changing Frontier
Source:
The Changing Frontier
Author(s):

Hezekiah Agwara

Philip Auerswald

Brian Higginbotham

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226286860.003.0012

The notion of the “frontier” has changed from being a geographical one, to one that delineates the pursuit and production of scientific knowledge. We first summarize the dominant interpretations of the “frontier” in the United States and predecessor colonies over the past 400 years: agricultural (1610s-1880s), industrial (1890s-1930s), scientific (1940s-1980s), and algorithmic (1990s-present). We describe the difference between the algorithmic frontier and the scientific frontier. We then propose that the recent phenomenon referred to as “globalization” is actually better understood as the progression of the algorithmic frontier, as enabled by standards that in turn have facilitated the interoperability of firm-level production algorithms. We conclude by describing implications of the advance of the algorithmic frontier for scientific discovery and technological innovation.

Keywords:   algorithms, globalization, innovation, interoperability, information and communications technology, ICT, International Standards Organization, ISO, production recipes, supply chains

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