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Charles Bell and the Anatomy of Reform$
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Carin Berkowitz

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780226280394

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226280424.001.0001

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London’s New Classrooms

London’s New Classrooms

London University and the Middlesex Hospital School

Chapter:
(p.103) Chapter Four London’s New Classrooms
Source:
Charles Bell and the Anatomy of Reform
Author(s):

Carin Berkowitz

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226280424.003.0005

This chapter discusses the founding of London University and the Middlesex Hospital School. London University was founded in 1827 in an attempt to educate London’s middle-class professionals and tradesmen, and its medical school catered to general practitioners. The university, however, lacked its own hospital, a site for practical teaching that had been one of the supposed benefits of establishing a university medical program in London. Charles Bell was a part of the original London University faculty, but after much tumult within the university, Bell left, publicly declaring his departure the result of a lack of adequate hospital training for students. After leaving London University, Bell helped to found the Middlesex Hospital School. Where hospital schools founded prior to London University had been ad-hoc additions to the private schools, those founded or developed in the 1830s became places of systematic education in clinical practice, partly in response to a model of medical education set out by London University. These hospital schools, where autopsies were uncommon, patients were not subjected to repeated physical examinations, and surgical operations were less frequently performed before a crowd, became models of what conservative reformers regarded as a traditionally British education.

Keywords:   Middlesex Hospital, hospital schools, conservative reform, London University, general practitioners, physiology

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