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1971A Year in the Life of Color$
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Darby English

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780226131054

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226274737.001.0001

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How It Looks to Be a Problem

How It Looks to Be a Problem

Chapter:
(p.52) (p.53) Chapter 1 How It Looks to Be a Problem
Source:
1971
Author(s):

Darby English

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226274737.003.0002

This chapter demonstrates how modernism was a connective space that answered the need to nurture interracial relations in a situation marked by the forcible separation of things for the sake of separation itself. It discusses how the conceptual coherency secured for Black Art during the late 1960s and into the 1970s depended to a large degree on a parallel effort to banish black modernists from the cultural landscape. It identifies the period with the dematerialization of art—meaning, among other things, the polemical reconceptualization of art-making as cultural production, that ostensibly more engaged type of practice that “politicized” the art world at this time. It also details the rise of the “Black Art expert”.

Keywords:   modernism, interracial relations, Black Art, black modernists, cultural production

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