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Hitler's GeographiesThe Spatialities of the Third Reich$
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Paolo Giaccaria and Claudio Minca

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780226274423

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226274560.001.0001

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Social Engineering, National Demography, and Political Economy in Nazi Germany: Gottfried Feder and His New Town Concept

Social Engineering, National Demography, and Political Economy in Nazi Germany: Gottfried Feder and His New Town Concept

Chapter:
(p.218) 10 Social Engineering, National Demography, and Political Economy in Nazi Germany: Gottfried Feder and His New Town Concept
Source:
Hitler's Geographies
Author(s):

Joshua Hagen

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226274560.003.0011

As a totalitarian ideology, National Socialism aimed to build a new political community, a Third Reich, based on social-Darwinist notions of race, space, and place. To operationalize these objectives, the regime embarked on a series of building programs geared toward a thorough spatial reordering of Germany’s society, demography, and economy. Spearheaded by a diffuse cadre of planners, architects, and engineers, these efforts spanned widely publicized plans to transform Germany’s major cities into venues for political aggrandizement to secretive programs establishing concentration and extermination camps. Among these ambitious but often inchoate and contradictory projects, the search for a new model for residential and settlement planning became a central imperative, paralleling the broadening imperatives of military-industrial expansion and reorganizing newly conquered territories. This chapter examines the practical, ideological, and technocratic impulses guiding these endeavors as evidenced through Gottfried Feder’s book The New Town.

Keywords:   Gottfried Feder, planning, urbanism, political community, garden city

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