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Sartre, Foucault, and Historical ReasonA Poststructuralist Mapping of History$
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Thomas R. Flynn

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780226254708

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: March 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226254722.001.0001

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Foucault as Parrhesiast: His Last Course at the Collège de France (An Object Lesson in Axial History)

Foucault as Parrhesiast: His Last Course at the Collège de France (An Object Lesson in Axial History)

Chapter:
(p.260) Chapter Eleven Foucault as Parrhesiast: His Last Course at the Collège de France (An Object Lesson in Axial History)
Source:
Sartre, Foucault, and Historical Reason
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226254722.003.0011

Both Sartre and Foucault link the intelligibility of history with the intelligibility of struggle. And each offers an analysis of the relations of violence that usually accompany such warfare. This chapter analyzes how each understands violence, its conditions and possible eradication and how this affects their respective accounts of the meaning of history. The chapter concludes by pointing out that the Foucauldian prism resists the totalizing movement of “original choice” and the Sartrean hermeneutic that seeks to reveal it. Despite lines or aspects of subjectivation that pervade his thought, Foucault's “self” remains prismatic, his historical intelligibility polyhedral, and his “experience” nonfoundational and derivative. If his histories exhibit passion, it is that of the cartographer, not the diarist.

Keywords:   Sartre, Foucault, history, violence, experience

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