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The Political OrchestraThe Vienna and Berlin Philharmonics During the Third Reich$
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Fritz Trümpi

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780226251394

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226251424.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 20 October 2019

Repertoire and Politicization: National Socialism and the Politics of Programming

Repertoire and Politicization: National Socialism and the Politics of Programming

Chapter:
(p.174) 6 Repertoire and Politicization: National Socialism and the Politics of Programming
Source:
The Political Orchestra
Author(s):

Fritz Trümpi

Kenneth Kronenberg

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226251424.003.0007

Under National Socialism, the images of the Vienna and Berlin Philharmonics were marked by strong differences. This chapter investigates whether such differences can also be recognized at the level of the orchestras’ repertoires. In addition, the chapter highlights the relationship between the repertoires and issues of canonization. What emerges is a picture of the Berlin Philharmonic as holding a form of monopoly on the performance of German orchestral music abroad. Meanwhile, the Vienna Philharmonic cultivated in a certain way, and ever more strongly, a “Viennese sound” under National Socialism—the waltzes and polkas of the Strauss family, which were played with increasing frequency and culminated in the founding of the New Year’s concerts still performed today, serve as one such example.

Keywords:   competition between cities, competition between orchestras, Viennese sound, German sound, canonization of music, political concerts, WWII, Wehrmacht concerts, Wilhelm Furtwängler, work break concerts

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