Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Accounting for TasteThe Triumph of French Cuisine$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Priscilla Parkhurst Ferguson

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780226243238

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226243276.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 26 July 2021

Food Nostalgia

Food Nostalgia

Chapter:
(p.111) Chapter Four Food Nostalgia
Source:
Accounting for Taste
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226243276.003.0005

À la recherche du temps perdu (1913–1927), Marcel Proust's novel of artistic redemption, is one of the greatest works of the twentieth century. The novel is also an emblematic text of French culture, one that resurrects a bygone France—a France accessible through gustatory communion. It produces a national culinary landscape in which the French recognize an idea of country. This chapter examines some of the texts that marked French cuisine as a dominant trope of French national identity, along with some of the consequences of that dominance. It shows how Proust's À la recherche du temps perdu illuminates wonderfully well the dynamics of a nationalizing culinary culture. It considers French “gastro-literature” and the salient connection between matters literary and culinary as a distinctive feature of French culture in general.

Keywords:   Marcel Proust, À la recherche du temps perdu, France, French cuisine, national identity, culinary culture, gastro-literature, French culture

Chicago Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.