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Accounting for TasteThe Triumph of French Cuisine$
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Priscilla Parkhurst Ferguson

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780226243238

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226243276.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 26 July 2021

Prologue Eating Orders

Prologue Eating Orders

Chapter:
(p.1) Prologue Eating Orders
Source:
Accounting for Taste
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226243276.003.0001

This book is both a geography and genealogy of culinary culture, focusing on France as the template for thinking about food because the country and its culinary customs, or foodways, are emblematic of a distinctive, highly constructed, and sophisticated conception of food. It explores the scene of “culinarity,” or what the French would call le culinaire (“the culinary”) and looks at some of the ways in which food structures and expresses the worlds in which it is found. Drawing on culinary texts such as cookbooks, menus, essays, poems, novels, film and television, the book documents French culinary identity from its beginnings in the seventeenth century through to its elaboration over the nineteenth century and into the twentieth. It places “cooking” against “cuisine,” describes contemporary French cuisine, considers food consumers and consumption, examines some of the texts that marked French cuisine as a dominant trope of French national identity, and reflects on the place of French cuisine within the culinary order of a postwar, postmodern, postindustrial society marked by globalization and internationalization.

Keywords:   food, French cuisine, culinary culture, culinarity, cooking, national identity, globalization, internationalization, consumers, consumption

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