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Scanner Data and Price Indexes$
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Robert C. Feenstra and Matthew D. Shapiro

Print publication date: 2002

Print ISBN-13: 9780226239651

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: February 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226239668.001.0001

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High-Frequency Substitution and the Measurement of Price Indexes

High-Frequency Substitution and the Measurement of Price Indexes

Chapter:
(p.123) 5 High-Frequency Substitution and the Measurement of Price Indexes
Source:
Scanner Data and Price Indexes
Author(s):

Robert C. Feenstra

Matthew D. Shapiro

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226239668.003.0007

This chapter investigates the behavior of price indexes constructed from high-frequency scanner data. It also explores how consumer behavior at high-frequency—specifically, weekly purchases of canned tuna—influence the application of index number formulas that have typically been implemented for lower-frequency or time-average data. The upward bias of the chained Törnqvist makes it highly inappropriate to use at high frequency, and it seems that this bias is due to inventory behavior. The shopping patterns of the Northeast regions reveal marked inventory behavior and an upward bias of the chained Törnqvist, supporting the idea that such behavior causes the upward bias. The data on tuna show substantial high-frequency variation in price and substantial response of consumer demand to this variation in price, suggesting inventory behavior. There is a link between inventory behavior—especially in the Northeast—and the upward bias of the chained Törnqvist.

Keywords:   price indexes, canned tuna, consumer behavior, scanner data, Törnqvist, upward bias, shopping patterns, Northeast regions, inventory

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