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A Peaceful ConquestWoodrow Wilson, Religion, and the New World Order$
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Cara Lea Burnidge

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780226232317

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226232454.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 21 October 2019

New World Order

New World Order

Chapter:
(p.77) 4 New World Order
Source:
A Peaceful Conquest
Author(s):

Cara Lea Burnidge

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226232454.003.0005

This chapter further explores the relationship Wilson imagined between Christianity and internationalism by discussing the limits of his conceptions of a Christianized world order. When much of the world expected Wilson to make a grand statement about the importance of God in world affairs, he made no effort to include “God,” “Providence,” or any other formal articulation about the state of religion in the Treaty of Versailles. Wilson's approach to foreign policy, much like his approach to domestic concerns, prioritized the establishment of an enduring moral structure for governance over sectarian particularities or temporary political concerns. Religion, in Paris in 1919, was but one among many diplomatic concerns and received no special favor from Wilson.

Keywords:   Woodrow Wilson, Christianity, internationalism, international relations, world order, foreign policy, Treaty of Versailles

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