Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Economic Analysis of the Digital Economy$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Avi Goldfarb, Shane M. Greenstein, and Catherine E. Tucker

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780226206844

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226206981.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 04 June 2020

Understanding Media Markets in the Digital Age

Understanding Media Markets in the Digital Age

Economics and Methodology

Chapter:
(p.385) 13 Understanding Media Markets in the Digital Age
Source:
Economic Analysis of the Digital Economy
Author(s):

Brett Danaher

Samita Dhanasobhon

Michael D. Smith

Rahul Telang

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226206981.003.0013

Digitization raises a variety of important academic and managerial questions around firm strategies and public policies for the content industries, with many of these questions influenced by the erosion of copyright caused by Internet file-sharing. At the same time, digitization has created many new opportunities to empirically analyze these questions by leveraging new data sources and abundant natural experiments in media markets. In this chapter the authors describe the open “big picture” questions related to digitization and the copyright industries, and discuss methodological approaches to leverage the new data and natural experiments in digital markets to address these questions. They close the chapter with a specific proof of concept research study that analyzes an important academic and managerial question — the impact of legitimate streaming services on the demand for piracy. They use ABC’s decision to add its content to Hulu.com as a natural experiment and show that it resulted in an economically and statistically significant drop in piracy of that content.

Keywords:   piracy, regulation, digital distribution, creative incentives, copyright, natural experiment

Chicago Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.