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Serengeti IVSustaining biodiversity in a coupled human-natural system$
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Anthony R. E. Sinclair, Kristine L. Metzger, Simon A. R. Mduma, and John M. Fryxell

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780226195834

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226196336.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 26 September 2021

From Bacteria to Elephants

From Bacteria to Elephants

Effects of Land-Use Legacies on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Processes in the Serengeti-Mara Ecosystem

Chapter:
(p.194) (p.195) Eight From Bacteria to Elephants
Source:
Serengeti IV
Author(s):

Louis V. Verchot

Naomi L. Ward

Jayne Belnap

Deborah Bossio

Michael Coughenour

John Gibson

Olivier Hanotte

Andrew N. Muchiru

Susan L. Phillips

Blaire Steven

Diana H. Wall

Robin S. Reid

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226196336.003.0008

Generally, ecological research has considered the aboveground and belowground components of ecosystems separately. Consequently, frameworks for integrating the two components are not well developed. Integrating the microbial components into ecosystem ecology requires different approaches from those offered by plant ecology, partly because of the scales at which microbial processes operate and partly because of measurement constraints. Studies have begun to relate microbial community structure to ecosystem function. results suggest that excluding people and livestock from the MMNR, or preventing heavier livestock from grazing around settlements, may not change the general structure of the ecosystem (soils, plant structure), but can change the numbers and diversity of wildlife, nematodes and microbes in this ecosystem in subtle ways.

Keywords:   conservation, landscape management, Mara-Serengeti ecosystem, microbial community, ecosystem ecology

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