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Serengeti IVSustaining biodiversity in a coupled human-natural system$
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Anthony R. E. Sinclair, Kristine L. Metzger, Simon A. R. Mduma, and John M. Fryxell

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780226195834

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226196336.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 26 September 2021

The Role of Research in Conservation and the Future of the Serengeti

The Role of Research in Conservation and the Future of the Serengeti

Chapter:
(p.774) (p.775) Twenty-Six The Role of Research in Conservation and the Future of the Serengeti
Source:
Serengeti IV
Author(s):

Anthony R. E. Sinclair

Julius D. Keyyu

Simon A. R. Mduma

Mtango Mtahiko

Emily Kisamo

J. Grant C. Hopcraft

John M. Fryxell

Kristine L. Metzger

Markus Borner

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226196336.003.0026

The history of research in Serengeti shows that with every decade different problems have appeared. These problems have been addressed by researchers with a view to providing information to be used by the Park managers. The earliest problems related to the lack of basic information on how the ecosystem worked – where did the migration go? What limited populations? Later decades produced problems related to the impact of increasing human populations on the habitats and animal numbers, and also how the Protected Area affects surrounding peoples – how was fire changing the savanna? How was poaching changing ungulate populations? How were animals damaging crops? Recent problems are focused on the impacts of development – how does a road across northern Serengeti affect the migration? How would offtake of water from the Mara River affect migrant species? Research has provided the relevant information and in most cases successful management decisions have been taken. Tanzania as a whole has also benefited from this research. We show how it is directly relevant to the major national concerns of economics, health, social welfare, ecosystem services and conservation.

Keywords:   conservation, Tanzania, Serengeti Research Project, great migration

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