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Serengeti IVSustaining biodiversity in a coupled human-natural system$
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Anthony R. E. Sinclair, Kristine L. Metzger, Simon A. R. Mduma, and John M. Fryxell

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780226195834

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226196336.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 18 September 2021

Socioecological Dynamics and Feedbacks in the Greater Serengeti Ecosystem

Socioecological Dynamics and Feedbacks in the Greater Serengeti Ecosystem

Chapter:
(p.584) (p.585) Twenty Socioecological Dynamics and Feedbacks in the Greater Serengeti Ecosystem
Source:
Serengeti IV
Author(s):

Ricardo M. Holdo

Robert D. Holt

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226196336.003.0020

Complex ecological systems are practically defined by the wide array of direct and indirect links among species, functional groups, and abiotic factors in ecosystems. This is captured, for example, in the enormous complex array of links that describe the Serengeti ecosystem food web structure. Depending on the relative importance of individual links, changes in the abundance of any given node can have positive, negative, or neutral effects on other elements in the network. Inserting ecosystems into the broader context of socio-ecological systems enhances this complexity and imposes new challenges. One key challenge for any modeling approach is to capture the minimum level of model complexity that adequately addresses the question of interest, and whether modeling a system as a socio-ecological system (versus purely as an ecological system) is warranted.

Keywords:   ecosystems, food web structure, exogenous influences, human impacts, wildlife populations

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