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Improving the Measurement of Consumer Expenditures$
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Christopher D. Carroll, Thomas F. Crossley, and John Sabelhaus

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780226126654

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226194714.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 18 October 2019

Asking Households about Expenditures

Asking Households about Expenditures

What Have We Learned?

Chapter:
(p.23) 1 Asking Households about Expenditures
Source:
Improving the Measurement of Consumer Expenditures
Author(s):

Thomas F. Crossley

Joachim K. Winter

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226194714.003.0002

There is mounting evidence of problems with the household budget surveys conducted by national statistical agencies in many countries. When designing household surveys, including surveys that measure consumption expenditure, numerous choices need to be made. Which survey mode should be used? Do recall questions or diaries provide more reliable expenditure data? How should the concept of a household be defined? How should the length of the recall period, the level of aggregation of expenditure items, and the response format be chosen? How are responses affected by incentives? Can computer-assisted surveys be used to reduce or correct response error in real time? In this chapter, we provide a selective review of the literature on these questions. We also suggest some promising directions for future research.

Keywords:   expenditure, consumption, measurement error, survey data, household budget surveys, survey mode, survey recall, survey diaries, computer-assisted surveys

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