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Disease, War, and the Imperial StateThe Welfare of the British Armed Forces during the Seven Years' War$
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Erica Charters

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780226180007

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226180144.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 03 December 2021

Imperial War at Home:

Imperial War at Home:

The Welfare of French Prisoners of War

Chapter:
(p.172) Chapter Six Imperial War at Home
Source:
Disease, War, and the Imperial State
Author(s):

Erica Charters

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226180144.003.0007

This chapter examines the administration and welfare of the 25,000 prisoners of war held in Britain during the Seven Years War, highlighting the central role of public opinion in the welfare of the armed forces. It opens with an overview of the presence of prisoners in Britain during the war, before detailing the administration of their care. Public discussions on their treatment and the nature of charitable associations for their support are analysed to demonstrate how Britons understood the relationship between troop welfare and state power. The chapter concludes with a discussion of humanitarianism, public opinion, and the eighteenth-century British state, illustrating how expertise in manpower was essential to convincing an increasingly powerful public sphere that British administration of the war was effective and followed sound military and moral principles.

Keywords:   prisoners of war, public sphere, charity, humanitarianism, British state

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