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In Search of Cell HistoryThe Evolution of Life's Building Blocks$
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Franklin M. Harold

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780226174143

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226174310.001.0001

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Cells, Genes, and Evolution

Cells, Genes, and Evolution

On the Nature and Workings of Life

Chapter:
(p.1) Chapter One Cells, Genes, and Evolution
Source:
In Search of Cell History
Author(s):

Franklin M. Harold

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226174310.003.0001

An introductory chapter. Where the cell doctrine came from, the place of microorganisms in cell theory, how the distinction between prokaryotes and eukaryotes came to be appreciated, and the traditional classification of living things into five kingdoms. Turning to contemporary matters, cells are presented as molecular systems of inordinate complexity. Is cell structure and function wholly specified by the genes? Much of it is, but not all. There is good evidence that spatial organization, including morphology, is not specified by genes but arises by self-organization, and is often transmitted independently of genes.

Keywords:   cell theory, microorganisms, spatial organization, molecular systems, complexity, genes rule, extragenic inheritance

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