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Darwin's OrchidsThen and Now$
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Retha Edens-Meier and Peter Bernhardt

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780226044910

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226173641.001.0001

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Phylogeny of Orchidaceae Tribe Diurideae and Its Implications for the Evolution of Pollination Systems

Phylogeny of Orchidaceae Tribe Diurideae and Its Implications for the Evolution of Pollination Systems

Chapter:
(p.91) Five Phylogeny of Orchidaceae Tribe Diurideae and Its Implications for the Evolution of Pollination Systems
Source:
Darwin's Orchids
Author(s):

Peter H. Weston

Andrew J. Perkins

James O. Indsto

Mark A. Clements

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226173641.003.0005

Darwin (1877) interpreted the floral structure and role of cross-pollination in several orchid species endemic to Australasia and now placed in the tribe Diurideae. During the 20th century, the pollination ecology of some Australian species was defined by a number of talented amateurs (Chapters 6 and 7). Using DNA sequencing and a combination of vegetative and reproductive characters, the authors of this chapter construct a phylogeny of genera in this tribe. The phylogeny is used to determine the origin of the tribe and evolutionary trends including the evolution of species that secrete nectar, the derivation of self-pollinated species, and origin of flowers that mimic the bodies of female insects.

Keywords:   Australasia, Darwin, Diurideae, DNA, phylogeny, sequencing

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