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Darwin's OrchidsThen and Now$
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Retha Edens-Meier and Peter Bernhardt

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780226044910

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226173641.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 02 August 2021

Pollination of South African Orchids in the Context of Ecological Guilds and Evolutionary Syndromes

Pollination of South African Orchids in the Context of Ecological Guilds and Evolutionary Syndromes

Chapter:
(p.71) Four Pollination of South African Orchids in the Context of Ecological Guilds and Evolutionary Syndromes
Source:
Darwin's Orchids
Author(s):

Steven D. Johnson

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226173641.003.0004

Darwin (1877) addressed floral adaptations and functions in some temperate orchids of southern Africa thanks to information provided by correspondents. Recent research shows that flowering periods of these orchids are restricted regionally by geographic and climate patterns (Chapters 10 and 12). The diversity of these orchid species may also be explained in part by the broad range of insect pollinators they exploit and usually do not reward (Chapters 2, 5, 7, 10). These include but are not restricted to a variety of bees and flies showing varying lengths in mouthparts and preferred rewards (e.g. nectar vs. oil). Based on floral diversity in southern Africa, orchids play a role in guilds of plant species exploiting the same pollinator groups.

Keywords:   Africa, bees, climatic, Darwin, flies, geographic, guilds, mouthparts, nectar, oil

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