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Invasive Species in a Globalized WorldEcological, Social, and Legal Perspectives on Policy$
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Reuben P. Keller, Marc W. Cadotte, and Glenn Sandiford

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780226166049

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226166216.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 17 September 2021

Reducing Damaging Introductions from International Species Trade through Invasion Risk Assessment

Reducing Damaging Introductions from International Species Trade through Invasion Risk Assessment

Chapter:
(p.163) Chapter Eight Reducing Damaging Introductions from International Species Trade through Invasion Risk Assessment
Source:
Invasive Species in a Globalized World
Author(s):

Michael Springborn

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226166216.003.0008

In several recent analyses a unified framework is developed for organizing information to decide whether to allow intentional trade of a potentially invasive species. Recent estimates of the expected net benefits from upfront invasion risk assessment for different groups—plants for planting and herpetofauna—fall in a range from $54K-$141K per species assessed, suggesting substantial returns to a proactive approach. Two essential components of this risk assessment framework include (1) a statistical-ecological model of species invasion threat, and (2) a mechanism for mapping potential benefits and costs from trade into a threat level threshold beyond which non-native species are deemed too risky for importation. Data and future research needs for improving ecological-economic risk assessment of potentially invasive biological imports include: (1) better estimates of invasion welfare losses by taxon, (2) broader estimates of import benefits that assess benefits generated throughout the import value chain, (3) consistent collection, maintenance and access to detailed trade data.

Keywords:   invasive species, economics, bioeconomics, herpetofauna, reptiles, plants, risk assessment

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