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Invasive Species in a Globalized WorldEcological, Social, and Legal Perspectives on Policy$
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Reuben P. Keller, Marc W. Cadotte, and Glenn Sandiford

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780226166049

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226166216.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 17 September 2021

Final Thoughts: Nature and Human Nature

Final Thoughts: Nature and Human Nature

Chapter:
(p.381) Chapter Seventeen Final Thoughts: Nature and Human Nature
Source:
Invasive Species in a Globalized World
Author(s):

Glenn Sandiford

Reuben P. Keller

Marc Cadotte

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226166216.003.0017

During the past quarter-century, public awareness about invasive species has reached unprecedented levels around the world, but a comparable transformation in policy is lagging. Basic knowledge about invasive species is still seriously lacking in multiple policy-relevant areas, notably risk assessment. Small-scale impacts justify the fight against invasive species, while biodiversity’s broad-scale resilience offers hope for restoration of habitats and native species. The piecemeal approach to invasive species policy needs a unifying framework, guided by an overarching ethic that transcends time and place in addressing the “appropriateness” of non-native species in our globalizing world. Such an ethic, while acknowledging that some invasive species become permanently embedded in ecosystems, must utilize species origin as its foundational principle, rather than species impact/benefit or ecosystem service. The development of a policy ethic for invasive species requires interdisciplinary collaboration, with ecologists in a leadership role.

Keywords:   invasive species, policy, ethic, risk assessment, globalization, inter-disciplinary, social responses

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