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Invasive Species in a Globalized WorldEcological, Social, and Legal Perspectives on Policy$
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Reuben P. Keller, Marc W. Cadotte, and Glenn Sandiford

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780226166049

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226166216.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 28 September 2021

Does Enemy Release Contribute to the Success of Invasive Species? A Review of the Enemy Release Hypothesis

Does Enemy Release Contribute to the Success of Invasive Species? A Review of the Enemy Release Hypothesis

Chapter:
(p.252) Chapter Twelve Does Enemy Release Contribute to the Success of Invasive Species? A Review of the Enemy Release Hypothesis
Source:
Invasive Species in a Globalized World
Author(s):

Kirsten M. Prior

Jessica J. Hellmann

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226166216.003.0012

Once established, some introduced species experience increased fitness or demographic rates in their introduced range compared to their native range. The phenomenon of species becoming invasive as a result of increased success is referred to as “invasion success.” The enemy release hypothesis (ERH) is a leading hypothesis of invasion success; it posits that introduced species lose enemies and undergo release from enemy control. The ERH provides the underpinnings for the management practice of biological control; if enemy release is important, then re-establishing the link between introduced species and natural enemies could provide an effective means of control. Despite the popularity of the ERH as an explanation for invasion success and its implications for biological control, our review reveals that it has only been properly evaluated in limited contexts. More rigorous tests of the ERH are needed for invasive species in higher trophic levels and in aquatic systems to reveal the general importance of this hypothesis of invasion success. A fundamental understanding of what causes invasion success is essential to apply effective control strategies for the management of invasive species.

Keywords:   invasive species, enemy release, invasion success, fitness, biological control, meta-analysis

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