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Invasive Species in a Globalized WorldEcological, Social, and Legal Perspectives on Policy$
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Reuben P. Keller, Marc W. Cadotte, and Glenn Sandiford

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780226166049

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226166216.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 28 September 2021

Ecological Separation without Hydraulic Separation: Engineering Solutions to Control Invasive Common Carp in Australian Rivers

Ecological Separation without Hydraulic Separation: Engineering Solutions to Control Invasive Common Carp in Australian Rivers

Chapter:
(p.233) Chapter Eleven Ecological Separation without Hydraulic Separation: Engineering Solutions to Control Invasive Common Carp in Australian Rivers
Source:
Invasive Species in a Globalized World
Author(s):

Robert Keller

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226166216.003.0011

Common carp (Cyprinus carpio) is a major and widespread pest species in southeast Australia. The recent emphasis on increasing regulated river flows to improve environmental values requires prevention of carp spread into carp-free areas while still permitting the passage of major water flows. Biological control techniques are still many years away from effective implementation. In the meantime, the use of engineered structures represents an important mechanism for the exclusion of carp. Two types of structure are discussed herein. With the first, the principle of species separation is based on the carp’s jumping ability, in contrast to the non-jumping behavior of indigenous species, and is thus discriminatory. The second type of structure is designed to capture all biomass and, accordingly, is non-discriminatory. Case studies indicate that a discriminatory structure works well within fishways, but is not particularly effective in a riverine situation where all species tended to avoid the structure. In contrast, a non-discriminatory structure tested by way of a physical model was very effective, capturing better than 97% of introduced samples of carp eggs and carp fingerlings. Of the less than 3% that did pass through the structure, one-tenth — or less than 0.3% of the total introduced sample — was considered viable.

Keywords:   invasive species, common carp, Cyprinus carpio, Australia, environmental flows, Glenelg River, Williams carp cage, continuous deflective separation

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