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Stitching the West Back TogetherConservation of Working Landscapes$
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Susan Charnley, Thomas E. Sheridan, and Gary P. Nabhan

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780226165684

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226165851.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 28 September 2021

The Quivira Experience

The Quivira Experience

Reflections From a “Do” Tank

Chapter:
(p.81) 5 The Quivira Experience
Source:
Stitching the West Back Together
Author(s):

Courtney White

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226165851.003.0006

Founded in 1997, the Quivira Coalition’s objective is to foster cost-efficient revitalization of the western landscape through education, innovation, collaboration, and progressive land stewardship at the grassroots level. Using a consensus-based approach to land management called “the radical center,” Quivira has brought together opposing philosophies from ranchers and environmentalists to develop centrist solutions to rangeland conflict. Quivira developed the “New Ranch” approach, a more aggressive and systematic philosophy using planned grazing, updated monitoring practices, building common ground between stakeholders, and educating diverse audiences. This approach shows great potential, but it still must contend with challenges like insufficient funding, bureaucratic constraints, and ranchers’ waning involvement. Notwithstanding its learning curve, Quivira’s efforts have yielded important returns, especially from the standpoint of education, publications, and collaborations. These efforts are a sound reminder that conservation must continue to contend with climate change, bureaucratic regulations, integral costs, funding innovations and stakeholders’ interests.

Keywords:   Quivira, radical center, new ranch, stakeholders, collaboration

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